Aedes albopictus oviposits with other Aedes species in artificial oviposition cups: a case study in Knox County, Tennessee, U.S.A (2024)

Related Papers

Journal of Medical Entomology

Interspecific Larval Competition Between Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Northern Virginia

2008 •

Naoya Nishimura

View PDF

Journal of Medical Entomology

Larval Mosquito Habitat Utilization and Community Dynamics of Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae)

2012 •

Dina M Fonseca, Isik Unlu

View PDF

Oecologia

Spatial and temporal patterns of coexistence between competing Aedes mosquitoes in urban Florida

2009 •

Paul T. Leisnham

View PDF

Journal of Medical Entomology

Mapping Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes albopictus Vector Mosquito Distribution in Brownsville, TX

2019 •

Anne Neale

Aedes mosquitoes are vectors of several emerging diseases and are spreading worldwide. We investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) mosquito trap captures in Brownsville, TX, using high-resolution land cover, socioeconomic, and meteorological data. We modeled mosquito trap counts using a Bayesian hierarchical mixed-effects model with spatially correlated residuals. The models indicated an inverse relationship between temperature and mosquito trap counts for both species, which may be due to the hot and arid climate of southern Texas. The temporal trend in mosquito populations indicated Ae. aegypti populations peaking in the late spring and Ae. albopictus reaching a maximum in winter. Our results indicated that seasonal weather variation, vegetation height, human population, and land cover determine which of the two Aedes species will predominate.

View PDF

Pest Management Science

Area-wide management of Aedes albopictus: choice of study sites based on geospatial characteristics, socioeconomic factors and mosquito populations

2011 •

Dina M Fonseca, Isik Unlu

View PDF

Biological Invasions

Testing Predictions of Displacement of Native Aedes by the Invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes Albopictus in Florida, USA

2001 •

Naoya Nishimura

The Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus arrived in the USA in 1985 in used automobile tires from Japan and became established in Texas. This species has since spread to become the most abundant container-inhabiting mosquito in the southeastern USA, including Florida, where it has reduced the range of another non-indigenous mosquito, Aedes aegypti. To assess the accuracy of predictions that A. albopictus would competitively exclude the native Eastern Treehole Mosquito Aedes triseriatus from tires but not from treeholes (Livdahl and Willey (1991) Science 253: 189–191), we extensively monitored the abundances of mosquito immatures before and after the Asian Tiger invaded these habitats in south Florida. These field data failed to demonstrate exclusion of A. triseriatus from treeholes following the establishment of A. albopictus in this microhabitat in 1991. However, A. albopictus had significantly higher metamorphic success and showed a significant increase in mean crowding on A. triseriatus in treeholes monitored from 1991 to 1999. In urban and suburban sites, A. triseriatus was uncommon in abandoned tires even before the arrival of A. albopictus. In some wooded sites, there is evidence for a decline in numbers of A. triseriatus in used tires and cemetery vases, but the native species has not been excluded from these habitats. Overall, the negative effect of A. albopictus on A. triseriatus has been less severe than that on A. aegypti. Experiments outdoors in surrogate treeholes showed that A. albopictus was more successful than A. triseriatus in survival to emergence in the presence of predatory larvae of the native mosquito Toxorhynchites rutilus when first instar predators encountered both prey species shortly after their hatch. Eggs of A. albopictus also hatched more rapidly than those of A. triseriatus, giving larvae of the invasive species an initial developmental advantage to escape predation. Biological traits that may favor A. albopictus are offset partly by greater treehole occupancy by A. triseriatus and the infrequency of the invasive mosquito species in undisturbed woodlands, which mitigates against displacement of the native mosquito in these habitats.

View PDF

Journal of Medical Entomology

Interspecific Larval Competition Between Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Northern Virginia

2008 •

Naoya Nishimura

View PDF

Journal of Medical Entomology

Habitat Segregation of Mosquito Arbovirus Vectors in South Florida

2006 •

Naoya Nishimura

View PDF

Condition-Specific Competitive Effects of the Invasive Mosquito Aedes albopictus on the Resident Culex pipiens Among Different Urban Container Habitats May Explain Their Coexistence in the Field

Paul T. Leisnham

Condition-specific competition, when environmental conditions alter the outcome of competition, can foster the persistence of resident species after the invasion of a competitively superior invader. We test whether condition-specific competition can facilitate the areawide persistence of the resident and principal West Nile virus vector mosquito Culex pipiens with the competitively superior invasive, Aedes albopictus, in water from different urban container habitats. (2) Methods: We tested the effects of manipulated numbers of A. albopictus on C. pipiens survival and development in water collected from common functional and discarded containers in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The experiment was conducted with typical numbers of larvae found in field surveys of C. pipiens and A. albopictus and container water quality. (3) Results: We found increased densities of A. albopictus negatively affected the survivorship and development of C. pipiens in water from discarded containers but had li...

View PDF
Aedes albopictus oviposits with other Aedes species in artificial oviposition cups: a case study in Knox County, Tennessee, U.S.A (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Foster Heidenreich CPA

Last Updated:

Views: 5650

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (76 voted)

Reviews: 91% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Foster Heidenreich CPA

Birthday: 1995-01-14

Address: 55021 Usha Garden, North Larisa, DE 19209

Phone: +6812240846623

Job: Corporate Healthcare Strategist

Hobby: Singing, Listening to music, Rafting, LARPing, Gardening, Quilting, Rappelling

Introduction: My name is Foster Heidenreich CPA, I am a delightful, quaint, glorious, quaint, faithful, enchanting, fine person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.